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Useful info for Big Reactor turbine coils.


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Did some testing using 6 different blocks for the power coils in a big reactor turbine setup.  I used the same small turbine setup to test the different blocks so it wasn't the most efficient test.  Your results would probably be slightly different from mine.  Each of these tests had 3 things in common, the turbine, the number of blocks used to make the coil(8), and the RPM I tried to stabilize the turbine at(exactly 1800RPM).  The 6 blocks I used in this test are IRON, GOLD, ELECTRUM, FLUXED ELECTRUM, SHINY METAL, and ENDERIUM.  Iron is the baseline, while the others are the best blocks you can use in tekkit.

 

The results: 1800RPM rotational speed, stabilized.  There is about an error of 1% in this test...  so +/- 1%

 

IRON BLOCK

output = 475 RF/tick

steam usage = 145 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 5

RF per mb of steam = 3.28/1

 

GOLD BLOCK

output = 1663 RF/tick

steam usage = 253 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 10

RF per mb of steam = 6.57/1

 

ELECTRUM BLOCK

output = 2376 RF/tick

steam usage = 289 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 11

RF per mb of steam = 8.22/1

 

FLUXED ELECTRUM BLOCK

output = 2833 RF/tick

steam usage = 318 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 12

RF per mb of steam = 8.91/1

 

SHINY METAL BLOCK

output = 3564 RF/tick

steam usage = 361 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 14

RF per mb of steam = 9.83/1

 

ENDERIUM BLOCK

output = 5056 RF/tick

steam usage = 433 mb/tick

min number of turbine blades required = 17

RF per mb of steam = 11.68/1

 

With this information, you could design a turbine(s) that use nearly the exact amount of steam your reactor can produce.  This should give you the most efficient reactor-turbine(s) setup you can make.

 

2 more things to note when making the power coil...

 

1: The coil does not need to be a full ring of 8 blocks, you can have as few as 2 blocks in a given coil and it will still produce power, this allows you to fine tune your turbine to the amount of steam your reactor produces even better.

 

2: the coil does not need to be made of a single metal.  In fact, you can have a single coil made from 8 different types of metal and the turbine will still operate properly.  This is due to the turbine calculating power generation and torque requirements on a per block basis.  so mix and matching your metals works just fine.

Edited by jakalth
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Do you have an estimate how many Aqueous Accumulators each of these setups take to feed it enough water/steam?

The main thing holding me back from building a turbine is the potentially huge "waterfield" required to get it running.

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Do you have an estimate how many Aqueous Accumulators each of these setups take to feed it enough water/steam?

The main thing holding me back from building a turbine is the potentially huge "waterfield" required to get it running.

 

I'm using a fairly standard setup with a reactor and turbine. My turbine is using about 850 mb/t of steam and with the returned water to the reactor the system is self-sustaining (from a water perspective) with only 6 accumulators. This design is using 0.025 mb/t of fuel and is producing just below 10000 RF/t.

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The turbines them selves take steam from a reactor. 

 

fluiducts can transfer 360mb/tick of steam per connection.  or 120mb/tick of water.

 

Tesseracts can transfer a nearly unlimited amount of any fluid.

 

extra utilities transfer pipes can move as much fluid as you can squeeze into them, but they need a fluid node for input, and the fluid node needs to have a stack of both mining and speed upgrades to max out at 8,000mb/tick.

 

an aqueous accumulator can generate 25mb/tick of water.

 

doing as plowmanplow has it setup, you could use tesseracts or transfer pipes too move all the fluids to and from your reactors.  This way, the limited input from a few aqueous accumulators would be enough to jump start your reactor, and keep it running.

 

Cost wise it seems to be that tesseracts are more cost effective then making transfer nodes...  The cost of the 32-64 upgrades gets close too the ridiculous range in the nodes.  without the upgrades, the transfer nodes can not move enough fluids to work.

 

last option is to build your reactor and turbine next to each other, that way you can line up the steam and water returns so that they touch each other.  the coolant port can output steam directly into the turbines input port.  And the turbines port switched to output can transfer water directly into the reactors input coolant port.  seems to be by far the cheapest solution.  you'll still need a third coolant port on your reactor too fill it initially and to keep it topped off.  but this way, you can get by with just 1 or 2 aqueous accumulators.

 

In order to do the last option, you actually need to build the turbine first.  the input/output on the turbine can not be set until the turbine is completed.  But the input/output on the reactor can be set before it is completed.  Either that, or build yourself inside the turbine and set the output while inside it.  It should stay set while you break your way back out and fill in the hole again.

Edited by jakalth
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According to KingLemming, Tesseracts act as a "connection in space and time" and have no artificial limits placed on them for transfers.

 

can confirm that, I'm actually pumping 10620mb/t through a single tesseract connection (6 turbines at the receiving part each running on 1770 mb/t steam) and this works just fine...

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  • 4 weeks later...

I am experimenting with Turbines now, and I must say your overview provided some very much-needed help.

 

For my current setup, it is essential to learn how Enderium Coils balance out with fan blades for scaling up. It seems that the ratio is roughly 1:2, i.e. each additional Enderium Block on your coil will require two additional fan blades on your rotor to spin them up properly. Some examples:

 

16 blocks - 34 blades for 824mB/t (@1800 rpm)

19 blocks - 40 blades for ~1020 mB/t (@1660 rpm)

21 blocks - 44 blades for 1124 mB/t (@1779 rpm)

 

The middle value is a bit flaky because it is from my second turbine that takes all the (oscillating) excess steam. It is stable enough, but won't go higher than 1660, although it probably would get quite close to 1800 if the steam was more steady.

I have an idea now how I will build my Truly Big Reactor. Probably 16-block Enderium coils on each turbine with 34 fan blades each, or whatever the steam source dictates around that point.

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Update:

28 blocks - 60 blades for 1524mB/t (@1810rpm)

I had assumed that the formula for number of rotor blades was 2n+2 (where n is the number of Enderium blocks), but it seems that it is actually progressive. Jakalth's result with 8 blocks and 17 blades would be 2n+1, while that data point now suggests 2n+4. So it takes slightly more blades per block, the bigger you size it.

 

I bumped into the size limit for this one. It seems that either the default Z max value for Turbines changed, or that Tekkit set it lower. It is only 16 blocks now. You can still stuff more things in if you increase Turbine diameter, though. So here is my 60-blade monster Turbine:

tekkit_60blades1.jpg

 

Outputs a nice amount of power, too:

tekkit_60blades2.png

Edited by Curunir
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